Library/Archive/Museum: DISASTER PLAN

Library/Archive/Museum

DISASTER PLAN WORKBOOK

TABLE OF CONTENTS

POLICY STATEMENT

 

CHAPTER 1: EMERGENCY PROCEDURES

Summary of emergency procedures

Fire safety tips

CHAPTER 2: DISASTER PROCEDURES

Persons to summon

Instructions to fire wardens

CHAPTER 3: DISASTER RESPONSE PLAN

Staff mobilization

Damage assessment

Recovery preparation

CHAPTER 4: RECOVERY PROCEDURES

Directory of Persons Responsible for Recovery

Damp books and minor emergencies

Wet books and paper

Photographic prints

Photographic films

Magnetic tape materials

Phonograph records

Computer equipment

CHAPTER 5: FLOOR PLANS AND PRIORITIES

Criteria

Floor plans with priorities

CHAPTER 6: OTHER EMERGENCIES

Bomb threats

Vandalism

Collapse of shelving

Rodent, insect and mold infestation

Summoning medical assistance

CHAPTER 7: SUPPLIES

Inventory of emergency supplies

Supplier list
Local hardware stores

APPENDICES

Appendix A: Damage Evaluation Form, Post Disaster Report Form

Appendix B: Faculty/Department & Unit Head/Supervisors Personnel List

Appendix C: Vacuum Freeze Drying Services

Appendix D: Photograph & Sound Conservation

Appendix E: Document Reprocessing Services

Appendix F: Book and Paper Conservation

POLICY STATEMENT

____________________is committed to maintaining a vigilant state of disaster preparedness for the _______________ Library/Archive/Museum, because all are susceptible to disasters. Enlightened self-interest tells us that to be prepared is the greatest weapon against disaster. In recognition of the possibility of both small and large disasters, the Disaster Preparedness Committee devised the following plan to ensure that appropriate actions are taken in the event of a disaster. This plan provides library/archive/museum staff with a set of disaster priorities, emergency procedure guidelines, lists of personnel and department floor plans. It will be updated annually to ensure accuracy and currency.

CHAPTER 1

Post this summary sheet on all staff bulletin boards. Supervisors should memorize it and have it readily available in case of an emergency.

SUMMARY OF EMERGENCY PROCEDURES

MEDICAL EMERGENCY: Call _______________. Describe the problem, give the exact location and your name. Security personnel will come to assist you. They will call health service if necessary. Do not try to administer first aid; you may do more harm than good. See “Medical Emergencies” in Chapter 6 for further instructions.

FIRE: Call _______________. If you have any doubts about your ability to extinguish the fire, secure and leave the area. Activate the nearest fire alarm or call _______________. They will call the Fire Department if necessary.

When a fire alarm is sounded, turn off all terminals. Save documents before turning off word processing terminals. Fire wardens will clear the building. All other personnel should follow the instructions of the fire wardens listed in Chapter 2, “Disaster Procedures.” When evacuating the building DO NOT USE ELEVATORS.

FLOODING OR WATER DAMAGE: Throw a plastic drop cloth (see Chapter 7, “Suppliers”) over affected area, then call _______________. Move as many books as possible out of the flooded area, if it is safe to do so. See Chapter 4 in the Disaster Plan Workbook, entitled “Recovery Procedures,” for instructions on how to treat each type of library/archive/museum material affected.

POWER FAILURE: Turn off all terminals. Secure the area before leaving. Upon return wait for further instructions before turning terminals on again.

VANDALISM: Do not confront the vandal. Walk discreetly to the nearest phone and call _______________. Arrange a meeting place so you can direct security personnel to the area affected. See Chapter 6, “Other Emergencies,” in the Disaster Plan Workbook, for more instructions.

BOMB THREAT: Although extremely unlikely an event, this is here for completeness. Keep the caller on the telephone as long as possible and WRITE DOWN as much of the following as you can obtain: time set for the explosion, location of the bomb, and the type of bomb. Call _______________, to report the bomb threat immediately. See Chapter 6, “Other Emergencies,” in the Disaster Plan Workbook, for more instructions.

FIRE SAFETY TIPS:

  • ALWAYS REPORT A FIRE BEFORE ATTEMPTING TO EXTINGUISH IT.
  • ALWAYS KEEP YOUR BACK TO YOUR ESCAPE ROUTE.
  • NEVER ATTEMPT TO EXTINGUISH A LARGE FIRE.
  • WHEN USING A FIRE EXTINGUISHER REMEMBER THE ACRONYM
P.A.S.S.

◦                     Pull

◦                     Aim

◦                     Squeeze

◦                     Sweep

CHAPTER 2

 

PERSONS TO SUMMON WHEN A DISASTER OCCURS

 

Alerting professional staff, supervisors and non-professional staff:

It is the responsibility of the first person observing the disaster to call ____________________, who will contact ____________________ and the department head of the affected area. _____________________ is responsible for contacting the Disaster Preparedness Committee, each of whom will be responsible for alerting the staff in the areas they represent, using telephone numbers listed by floor in Chapter 5, “Floor Plans and Priorities.”

CONTACT:

OFFICE PHONE:

HOME PHONE:

1. Dept. Head of Affected Area ____________________ ____________________

2.____________________________ ____________________ ____________________

3.____________________________ ____________________ ____________________

4.____________________________ ____________________ ____________________

5.____________________________ ____________________ ____________________

6.____________________________ ____________________ ____________________

7.____________________________ ____________________ ____________________

8.____________________________ ____________________ ____________________

9.____________________________ ____________________ ____________________

10.___________________________ ____________________ ____________________

EMERGENCY EVACUATION PROCEDURES

The only persons authorized to initiate an evacuation are:

1.____________________ at extension:____________________

2.____________________ at extension:____________________

3.____________________ at extension:____________________

4.____________________ at extension:____________________

5.____________________ at extension:____________________

SUMMARY OF EVACUATION PROCEDURES

1. The fire alarm/gong system will alert occupants that an evacuation has been called.

2. The Emergency Evacuation Director will control the evacuation from a control center on the first floor.

3. Fire wardens are responsible for clearing each floor of all occupants and directing them to exit safely using the fire tower stairways.

4. No one is allowed back in the building unless directed by the Emergency Evacuation Director.

CHAPTER 3

 

STAFF MOBILIZATION – Phase 1

A major disaster in the library would necessitate the evacuation of all personnel. In such a situation, actual recovery procedures to salvage the collections would have to wait until the building was officially declared safe to enter. Although such a situation is impossible to predict, the brief outline of procedures listed below will be followed.

Alert professional staff, supervisors and non-professional staff:_______________ will contact ____________________, ____________________, and the department head of the affected area. ____________________ is responsible for contacting all members of the Disaster Preparedness Committee. Each committee member will be responsible for alerting the staff in the areas they represent, using telephone numbers listed by floor in Chapter 5, “Floor Plans and Priorities.”

CONTACT:

OFFICE PHONE:

HOME PHONE:

1. Dept. Head of Affected Area ____________________ ____________________

2.____________________________ ____________________ ____________________

3.____________________________ ____________________ ____________________

4.____________________________ ____________________ ____________________

5.____________________________ ____________________ ____________________

6.____________________________ ____________________ ____________________

7.____________________________ ____________________ ____________________

8.____________________________ ____________________ ____________________

9.____________________________ ____________________ ____________________

10.___________________________ ____________________ ____________________

DAMAGE ASSESSMENT – Phase 2

Meeting location for reports and first phase planning:

If the building can be entered, meetings will take place at _______________. If the building cannot be entered, meetings will take place at _______________.

_______________, _______________, _______________ Police, and Fire Department officials will gather for a status report on the situation that should cover the extent of damage and when the building can be entered for recovery purposes. The Disaster Preparedness Committee will devise site visit procedures according to the extent of the damage and accessibility of the building. _______________or _______________ will appoint one or more staff to head the Control Center for 24 hours during the initial recovery phase, if necessary.

Basic site visit procedures:

The Disaster Preparedness Committee and Building Manager enter building to assess damage when entry to the building has been approved by fire officials. High priority areas will be assessed first, followed by other affected areas.

The Disaster Preparedness Committee and Building Manager record extent of damage in disaster recovery charts (Appendix A), indicating the following:

  • Type of damage (water, fire)
  • Type of material damaged (photographs, books, etc.)
  • Extent of damage, i.e., how much (volumes, #’s)
  • Brief environmental conditions (dampness, heat, etc.)
  • Wet carpets, broken files
  • Condition of surrounding area

Photographs of damage should be taken with Polaroid film for recovery planning purposes.

RECOVERY PREPARATION – Phase 3

Second meeting of Disaster Preparedness Committee:

After Phase 2 damage assessment, the Disaster Preparedness Committee will return to the designated Control Center and begin to plan a salvage operation for damaged materials. Based on information recorded in disaster recovery charts completed during the site visit of affected areas, the committee will:

  • Establish priorities.
  • Develop and assign teams for affected areas, using the names and telephone numbers recorded in Chapter 5, “Floor Plans and Priorities”, as well as the volunteer names and telephone numbers listed in Appendix B.
  • Assemble supplies from _______________, _______________, and other suppliers listed in the Disaster Plan Workbook, Chapter 7 “Supplies”.
  • Develop a schedule for implementation.
  • Define reporting mechanism and communication lines, including an established chain of command for recovery operations. This should include a method to deal with unforeseen modifications that need to be made during the recovery operation.

The chair of the Disaster Preparedness Committee will appoint an assistant to take minutes during all meetings, telephone for supplies and other necessities, organize deliveries of supplies, answer telephones, and assist in the management of the recovery process from the Control Center, as needed.

CHAPTER 4

DIRECTORY OF PERSONS RESPONSIBLE FOR RECOVERY

OFFICE PHONE:

HOME PHONE:

1.____________________ ____________________ ____________________

2.____________________ ____________________ ____________________

3.____________________ ____________________ ____________________

4.____________________ ____________________ ____________________

5.____________________ ____________________ ____________________

This section of the Disaster Plan Workbook includes recovery procedures for the following materials:

  • Recovery Procedures for Damp Books and Minor Emergencies
  • Recovery Procedures for Wet Books and Paper
  • Recovery Procedures for Photographic Prints
  • Recovery Procedures for Photographic Films
  • Recovery Procedures for Magnetic Tape Materials
  • Recovery Procedures for Phonograph Records
  • Recovery Procedures for Computer Equipment

In the event of a major disaster, the Disaster Preparedness Committee will direct a recovery operation using the procedures contained here. Minor emergencies and small scale disasters where fewer than 1,000 Library/archive/museum materials are affected, should be reported to _______________. _______________ will provide assistance in properly following the instructions in this chapter.

RECOVERY PROCEDURES FOR DAMP BOOKS AND MINOR EMERGENCIES

DAMP BOOKS are defined as books that are not dripping water. They can be wet around the edges or wet half-way through or just cool to the touch. These materials can be AIR DRIED.

Contact _______________ before undertaking instructions below. (See beginning of this chapter).

CAUTION:

1. All air drying MUST take place in a cool, dry place. Warm humid air encourages mold and mildew growth which can be more damaging than the original emergency. Try to keep the temperature below 70 Fahrenheit and the relative humidity below 55%. Use fans and dehumidifiers if needed. Keep the air in the area circulating.

2. Keep the drying area clean by removing wet debris such as wet carpeting and furniture as soon as possible because they contribute to a humid environment.

3. Never try to reshape or force damp volumes open as this will cause harmful distortion. They can be treated AFTER drying.

4. Sponge off mud and debris using clean water but ONLY if material does not have water soluble components such as watercolors, runny inks, tempera and dyes. Instead, air dry materials and brush off debris when completely dry.

5. Minimize handling of water damaged books. Paper and bindings are very fragile when wet.

 

PROCEDURES:

If books can be dried in immediate area, see #8 and #9 below for air drying instructions.

If books must be packed up and moved to drying area:

1. Keep a written record of what volumes are in which box (by floor, range number and call number) and remember to clearly label each box.

2. Use 1 and 1½ cubic foot, 200 test lb. cardboard boxes to pack-out and transfer damp books to the drying area. A one cubic foot box will hold about 15 volumes and weighs about 50 pounds when loaded.

3. Wrap each book in one piece of unprinted newsprint; this will prevent colors bleeding into one another. Precut sizes to save time.

4. Pack books SPINE SIDE DOWN IN A SINGLE ROW ON THE BOTTOM OF THE BOX. THIS ARRANGEMENT IS VERY IMPORTANT! DO NOT STACK BOOKS OR OTHER MATERIALS ON TOP. WATER DAMAGED MATERIALS WILL SAG AND DISTORT ESPECIALLY UNDER PRESSURE, CAUSING PERMANENT DEFORMITIES.

5. Seal box with packing tape and label contents with marker on all four sides as well as the top.

6. Stack 24-30 boxes (heaviest on the bottom, lightest on the top) on a shipping pallet. Shrink wrap entire pallet. Try to wrap same classification materials together.

7. Keep a record of what books are drying where.

8. Stand books upright (head to toe) in well ventilated drying area with fans or air conditioners to keep the air circulating. A book is completely dry when it is no longer cool to the touch.

9. While air drying, in the manner described above, the pages of some books may start to pull out of their covers under the extra water weight. Turn these books over (head to toe, toe to head) every 30 minutes to evenly distribute the pull.

  1. Especially damp books can be interleaved to remove additional excess moisture. Place unprinted, clean flat paper towels every 20 or 30 pages; be sure to change toweling and alternate pages every 15 minutes to prevent distortion. DO NOT USE FOLDED TOWELS AS THEY WILL PERMANENTLY DISTORT PAPER.
  2. Some books will dry distorted and misshapen. This can be greatly reduced AFTER completely drying by placing volumes under light pressure or, in extreme cases, rebinding.

 

SUPPLIES:

  • pens
  • dehumidifiers
  • note paper
  • large strong trash bags
  • fans
  • sponges
  • clean water source
  • unprinted paper towels

To pack up and move materials to drying area include:

  • markers for labeling
  • uniform 1 and 1½ cubic foot, 200 test lb. cardboard boxes
  • unprinted newsprint
  • wooden shipping pallets
  • large size shrink wrap

**SEE CHAPTER 7 OF THIS BOOK FOR ORDERING INFORMATION AND THE LOCATION OF LOCAL HARDWARE STORES.**

RECOVERY PROCEDURES FOR WET BOOKS AND PAPER

WET BOOKS (as opposed to DAMP BOOKS) are defined as books that are dripping water. They are extremely fragile and must be handled carefully as pages can easily fall out and covers can separate from the text block.

WET BOOKS should be vacuum freeze dried by a professional in the case of a major emergency (see Appendix C, “Vacuum Freeze Drying Services”). Vacuum freeze drying dries the material with the least distortion as the water goes directly from the liquid to gaseous state (vapor) without passing through the solid state, i.e., ice never forms. Meat freezers and household freezers do allow ice to form and consequently are not adequate.

Contact _______________ before undertaking instructions below. (See beginning of this chapter).

CAUTION:

1. Control the environment. Warm humid air encourages mold and mildew growth which can be more damaging than the original emergency. Try to keep the temperature below 70 Fahrenheit and the relative humidity below 55%. Use fans and dehumidifiers if needed. Keep the air in the area circulating.

2. Before starting any packout procedures, know what the damaged materials are. Specifically, glossy paper (like magazine paper, art books, etc.) is not salvageable after 5-6 hours in water as the inks run and the pages become irrevocably stuck together. Move on immediately to concentrate on salvageable material. Leather and vellum bindings are extremely fragile and should be rescued early or not at all.

3. NEVER try to reshape or force wet books open as this will cause harmful distortion or further mechanical damage. Do not remove damaged covers; books can be rebound or treated AFTER they are dry.

4. Sponge off mud and debris with clean water but ONLY if the material does not have any water soluble components such as watercolors, runny inks, tempera or dyes. Such material should be freeze dried and cleaned when dry.

5. DO NOT OVER PACK BOXES!

◦  The box will be too heavy to move.

◦  The freezing process works well only if it is slow and uniform.

◦  Over packed boxes will prevent books on the inside from drying at the same rate as

those near the outside.

◦  Books must have room to swell during freezing.

6. Minimize handling of wet books. Paper and bindings are very fragile when wet.

 

PROCEDURES:

1. Keep a written record of what volumes are in which box (by floor, range and call number) and remember to clearly label each box.

2. Use 2 and 1½ cubic foot, 200 test lb. cardboard boxes to packout and ship books to the freezer. A one cubic foot box will hold about 15 volumes and weighs about 50 pounds when loaded with water-logged books.

3. Wrap each book in one piece of unprinted newsprint; this will prevent colors from bleeding into one another and books from freezing together. Precut sizes to save time.

4. Pack books SPINE SIDE DOWN IN A SINGLE ROW ON THE BOTTOM OF THE BOX. THIS ARRANGEMENT IS VERY IMPORTANT! DO NOT STACK BOOKS OR OTHER MATERIALS ON TOP. WATER DAMAGED MATERIALS WILL SAG AND DISTORT EXPECIALLY UNDER PRESSURE, CAUSING PERMANENT DEFORMITIES.

5. Seal box with packing tape and label contents with a marker on all four sides as well as the top.

6. Stack 24-30 boxes (heaviest on the bottom, lightest on the top) on a shipping pallet. Shrink wrap entire pallet. Try to wrap same classification materials together.

7. Ship books to vacuum freeze dry facility (see Appendix C, “Vacuum Freeze Drying Services”) in refrigerated or freezer trucks to prevent mold growth. Keep careful records of shipment contents and dates.

 

SUPPLIES:

  • pens
  • note paper
  • markers for labeling
  • uniform 1 and 1½ cubic foot, 200 test lb. cardboard boxes
  • unprinted newsprint
  • wooden shipping pallets
  • large size shrink wrap
  • garden hoses
  • sponges
  • clean water source

**SEE CHAPTER 7 OF THIS BOOK FOR ORDERING INFORMATION AND THE LOCATION OF LOCAL HARDWARE STORES.**

RECOVERY PROCEDURES FOR PHOTOGRAPHIC PRINTS

Most photographs can be saved from water and smoke damage but not fire damage as the emulsion layer will melt from the heat. The following salvage procedures apply to photographic prints only. See PACK-OUT PROCEDURES FOR PHOTOGRAPHIC FILM for photographic film procedures including microfilm.

Contact _____________ before undertaking instructions below. (See beginning of this chapter).

CAUTION:

1. Only freeze photographs if they can be professionally dried as ice crystals may rupture the emulsion layer leaving marks on the film.

2. If you must freeze, use a BLAST FREEZER (see Chapter 7, “Supplies” and Appendix C, “Vacuum Freeze Drying Services”) which will freeze quickly forming small crystals. Small crystals will cause less damage than large crystals in the drying process.

3. When handling photographs, always do so at the edge as the emulsion layer will suffer damage easily.

DRY PHOTOGRAPHS SHOULD ALWAYS BE HANDLED WITH WHITE COTTON GLOVES TO PREVENT FINGERPRINTS.

 

MINOR EMERGENCIES

If a small number of photographs are water damaged, they can be treated in-house; if the situation is more serious, like severe smoke damage or staining, consult a professional photo conservator (see Appendix D, “Photograph and Sound Conservation”).

PROCEDURES:

1. Retain all bibliographic information.

2. Try to separate photographs from one another ONLY if the emulsion layers (image side) are not sticking to each other.

3. If a damaged photograph is in a frame, attempt to remove it only if the emulsion layer is not stuck to the glass; if so, leave the photograph in place and contact a professional photograph conservator (see Appendix D, “Photograph and Sound Conservation”).

4. Rinse muddy photographs in COLD CLEAN RUNNING water. Because items must remain wet prior to air drying or blast freezing, some damaged items may need short term immersion in COLD CLEAN RUNNING water contained in trays, or large PLASTIC (not metals as the chemicals may react) garbage containers. Agitate the water periodically and remove to dry after 30 minutes. If necessary, most non-color photographic processes can withstand immersion in water for up to 72 hours without serious damage. Color photographs can only be immersed in water up to 48 hours before the colors start to separate.

5. Remove photograph from the clean water and place it IMAGE SIDE UP on a rigid support like plexiglass, glass, or stiff cardboard.

6. Tilt the photograph (on the support) to allow excess water to run off.

7. Spread the photographs out face up on clean blotting paper or paper towels to air dry in a clean dry area. Some photographs will curl when drying. Consult a photograph conservator to flatten them after they are dry (see Appendix D, “Photograph and Sound Conservation”).

 

SUPPLIES:

  • pens
  • clean water source
  • note paper
  • blotting paper or paper towels
  • large plastic garbage containers
  • white cotton gloves
  • plexiglass sheets
  • sponges
  • garden hoses

**SEE CHAPTER 7 OF THIS BOOK FOR ORDERING INFORMATION AND THE LOCATION OF LOCAL HARDWARE STORES**

MAJOR EMERGENCIES

Contact _____________ before undertaking instructions below. (See beginning of this chapter).

Black and White Prints

PROCEDURES:

1. Retain all bibliographic information and labeling.

2. Try to separate photographs from one another ONLY if their emulsion layers (image side) are not sticking to each other.

3. If a damaged photograph is in a frame, attempt to remove it only if the emulsion layer is not stuck to the glass. Otherwise, leave the photograph in place and contact a professional photo conservator (see Appendix D, “Photograph and Sound Conservation”).

4. Rinse muddy photographs in COLD CLEAN RUNNING water. Because items must remain wet prior to air drying or blast freezing, some damaged items may need short term immersion in COLD CLEAN RUNNING water contained in trays, or large PLASTIC (not metals as the chemicals may react) garbage containers. Agitate the water periodically and remove to dry after 30 minutes. If necessary, most non-color photographic processes can withstand immersion for up to 72 hours without serious damage.

5. Remove photograph from the clean water and place it IMAGE SIDE UP on a rigid support like plexiglass, glass, or stiff cardboard.

6. Tilt the photograph (on the support) to allow excess water to run off.

7. Spread the photographs out face up on clean blotting paper or paper towels to air dry in a clean dry area. Some photographs will curl when drying. Consult a photograph conservator to flatten them after they are dry (see Appendix D, “Photograph and Sound Conservation”).

8. Or, contact a professional photographic reprocessing plant ASAP for cleaning and drying prints (see Appendix D, “Photograph and Sound Conservation” and Appendix E, “Document Reprocessing Services”).

 

Color Prints

PROCEDURES:

1. Retain all bibliographic information and labeling.

2. Try to separate photographs from one another ONLY if their image sides are not sticking to each other.

3. If a damaged photograph is in a frame, attempt to remove it. If the print is stuck to the glass frame, do not remove it. Leave the photograph in place and contact a professional photograph conservator (see Appendix D, “Photograph and Sound Conservation”).

4. Rinse muddy photographs in COLD CLEAN RUNNING water. Because items must remain wet prior to air drying or blast freezing, some damaged items may need short term immersion in COLD CLEAN RUNNING water contained in trays, or large PLASTIC (not metals as the chemicals may react) garbage containers. Agitate the water periodically and remove to dry after 20 minutes. If necessary, color prints can remain immersed in water for 48 hours before the colors start to separate.

5. Remove photograph from the clean water and place it IMAGE SIDE UP on a rigid support like plexiglass, glass, or stiff cardboard.

6. Tilt the photograph (on the support) to allow excess water to run off.

7. Spread the photographs out face up on clean blotting paper or paper towels to air dry in a clean dry area. Some photographs will curl when drying. Consult a photograph conservator to flatten them after they are dry (see Appendix D, “Photograph and Sound Conservation”).

8. Or, contact a professional photographic reprocessing plant ASAP for cleaning and drying prints (see Appendix D, “Photograph and Sound Conservation” and Appendix E, “Document Reprocessing Services”).

9. If necessary, blast freeze until arrangements can be made with professional reprocessors (see Appendix E, “Document Reprocessing Services”).

 

SUPPLIES:

  • pens
  • note paper
  • large plastic garbage containers
  • garden hoses
  • clean water source
  • white cotton gloves
  • sponges
  • plexiglass sheets
  • blotting paper or paper towels
  • white cotton gloves

**SEE CHAPTER 7 OF THIS BOOK FOR ORDERING INFORMATION AND THE LOCATION OF LOCAL HARDWARE STORES.**

RECOVERY PROCEDURES FOR PHOTOGRAPHIC FILMS

PHOTOGRAPHIC FILMS include all types of processed films such as microfilm, microfiche, photographic film, slides and movie reel film.

In most cases of fire, the extreme heat of the flames will damage microforms beyond repair, i.e., they will melt. Smoke and water damaged materials, however, can be salvaged. For major and minor emergencies, follow the instructions below. In extreme cases, the instructions below will stabilize the material until professional help is available. Microfilm and movie reel film are very difficult to handle and are best handled by a photographic film reprocessing company (see Appendix D, “Photograph and Sound Conservation” and Appendix E, “Document Reprocessing Services”).

Contact _____________ before undertaking instructions below. (See beginning of this chapter).

CAUTION:

1. Never let water-damaged photographic materials dry out.

2. Handle wet photographic films very carefully, touching only the edge of the film. When wet, the emulsion layer of photographic films soften and are very fragile and can be easily damaged.

3. Handle dry photographic films with white cotton gloves.

 

PROCEDURES:

1. Remove microfilm and roll film from their containers and their reels. Remove format films from their sleeves. If film cannot be separated from sleeves, enclosures, or each other, soak them as instructed below before trying to separate them. If possible, try to retain labeling/cataloguing information for identification purposes later.

2. Transfer the film into large PLASTIC (not metal as the chemicals in the film will react) garbage containers filled with COLD CLEAN water, preferably running water. If running water is not available, agitate water periodically. Change the water when it becomes warm or dirty. Wash for 30 minutes. If necessary, photographic films can stay in water for up to TWO DAYS without damage.

3. Black and white films should be dipped, or rinsed in a wetting solution such as Kodak Photoflo. Color slides and transparencies should be rinsed for 10 to 15 seconds in Kodak E6 stabilizer. Color negatives should be rinsed for one minute in Kodak C41 stabilizer.

4. After rinsing, dry at room temperature in a dust-free area.

5. Or, contact a professional photographic film reprocessing company as soon as possible (see Appendix D, “Photograph and Sound Conservation” and Appendix E, “Document Reprocessing Services”).

 

MICROFORMS MUST BE SHIPED SUBMERGED IN WATER AND IN SEALED CONTAINERS USUALLY PROVIDED BY THE REPROCESSING COMPANY.

 

SUPPLIES:

  • pens
  • note paper
  • large plastic garbage containers
  • small buckets
  • garden hoses
  • clean water source
  • white cotton gloves
  • sponges

**SEE CHAPTER 7 OF THIS BOOK FOR ORDERING INFORMATION AND THE LOCATION OF LOCAL HARDWARE STORES.**

RECOVERY PROCEDURES FOR MAGNETIC TAPE MATERIALS

MAGNETIC TAPE materials include audio and video cassettes, and computer floppy disks.

Most magnetic tape material is fairly heat resistant, able to withstand up to ONE HOUR in 200 Fahrenheit without severe damage. Prolonged exposure to water, however, is very damaging as it causes leaching of the chemicals that adhere the tape to the film base. It is possible but very difficult to clean a dirty, damaged tape and the quality will be severely sacrificed.

HARD DISKS, MEMORY STICKS, CD/DVDs, FLOPPY DISKS can be salvaged but as a general rule, the more advanced the technology, the less the chance of recovery.

Contact _____________ before undertaking instructions below. (See beginning of this chapter).

CAUTION:Never try to run damaged or wet tape on a regular tape drive.

PROCEDURES FOR FIRE AND HEAT DAMAGED MAGNETIC TAPES:

1. Clean dirt, ash, and smoke residue from containers and wraparounds before opening the container.

2. Contact _____________ to determine the extent of further salvage efforts.

PROCEDURES FOR WATER-DAMAGED MAGNETIC TAPES:

1. Move all tapes out of standing water.

2. Check labels to be sure they are legible. Replace those that are not legible, or use a wax crayon to identify them..

3. Quickly open, check and drain any water that may have entered the tape canisters.

4. Wet tapes must be hand dried and stored for 48 hours in a stable environment before running or winding on a tape drive.

5. When dry, tapes should be run against a felt pad (without the tape contacting the heads) to remove dried particles. Re-record as soon as possible. (See Appendix D, “Photograph and Sound Conservation”).

 

PROCEDURES FOR WATER-DAMAGED FLOPPY DISKS:

1. Retain, or replace labeling.

2. Remove the disk from the jacket by cutting it with NON-METALLIC scissors.

3. Rinse disk in cold distilled water.

4. Dry with lint free towels.

 

SUPPLIES:

  • pens
  • white cotton gloves
  • wax crayon
  • note paper
  • non-metallic scissors
  • lint-free towels
  • distilled water

*SEE CHAPTER 7 OF THIS BOOK FOR ORDERING INFORMATION AND THE LOCATION OF LOCAL HARDWARE STORES.**

RECOVERY PROCEDURES FOR PHONOGRAPH RECORDS

Not much can be done to save fire or water damaged records and LPs. The heat from the fire will melt the plastic quickly and prolonged exposure to water will warp them beyond repair. To a large extent, these materials are considered NOT SALVAGEABLE. However, undamaged records with surface dirt can be carefully cleaned. Cleaning is best when performed by a sound conservator (see Appendix D, “Photograph and Sound Conservation”). If necessary, the following procedures may be followed.

Contact _____________ before undertaking instructions below. (See beginning of this chapter).

CAUTION: Always handle phonograph records by the edges and wear white cotton gloves to avoid fingerprints.

PROCEDURES:

1. Wash record in a 1% solution of non-ionic wetting agent such as Kodak Photoflo. Use a soft brush to dislodge particles.

2. Rinse phonograph record with distilled water.

3. Place on a vertical rack, such as a dish rack, and let dry slowly away from heat.

 

SUPPLIES:

  • soft brush
  • clean distilled water
  • vertical drying rack (i.e. dish rack)
  • rubber gloves

** SEE CHAPTER 7 OF THIS BOOK FOR ORDERING INFORMATION AND THE LOCATION OF LOCAL HARDWARE STORES.**

RECOVERY PROCEDURES FOR COMPUTER EQUIPMENT

Call ____________________, to report failure of individual office workstations or an emergency in an office area which jeopardizes computer equipment.

In the event of a central system failure or any emergency (electrical, plumbing, etc) which could cause the failure of a central system, contact _______________ and _______________. It is their responsibility to contact the appropriate staff.

If the building is being evacuated, the following actions should be taken:

PROCEDURES:

1. “Save” work being done on systems and close files.

2. Turn off workstation and peripherals.

CHAPTER 5

 

COLLECTION PRIORITIES FOR DISASTER RECOVERY

Criteria

Priority one

High priority materials characterized by one or more of the following criteria:

Strong collections;

Collections that are irreplaceable, unique or that would be prohibitively expensive to replace, e.g. special collections and foreign language materials;

Collections that are heavily used.

Priority two

Core collection materials.

Priority three

Lesser priority materials characterized as follows:

Materials that are not heavily used and that are not essential;

Subject areas where currency (i.e. materials that could be replaced relatively easily) is most important;

Materials that we own in another format or that could be readily replaced in another format, e.g. certain runs of serials or areas where major preservation microfilming projects have been done by other libraries/archives/museums or commercial vendors;

Subject areas where our collecting has been spotty and the collection is of marginal value and interest.

FLOOR PLANS AND PRIORITIES

FIRST FLOOR STAFF DIRECTORY

OFFICE PHONE:

HOME PHONE:

1.____________________ ____________________ ____________________

2.____________________ ____________________ ____________________

3.____________________ ____________________ ____________________

4.____________________ ____________________ ____________________

5.____________________ ____________________ ____________________

FIRST FLOOR PRIORITIES

Priority 1:

Priority 2:

Priority 3:

 

FIRST FLOOR MAP HERE

 

SECOND FLOOR STAFF DIRECTORY

OFFICE PHONE:

HOME PHONE:

1.____________________ ____________________ ____________________

2.____________________ ____________________ ____________________

3.____________________ ____________________ ____________________

4.____________________ ____________________ ____________________

5.____________________ ____________________ ____________________

 

SECOND FLOOR PRIORITIES

 

Priority 1:

Priority 2:

Priority 3:

 

SECOND FLOOR MAP HERE

[The above should be set out for each floor] 

THIRD FLOOR STAFF DIRECTORY

[if applicable] 

OFFICE PHONE:

HOME PHONE:

1.____________________ ____________________ ____________________

2.____________________ ____________________ ____________________

3.____________________ ____________________ ____________________

4.____________________ ____________________ ____________________

5.____________________ ____________________ ____________________

 

THIRD FLOOR PRIORITIES

Priority 1:

Priority 2:

Priority 3:

 

THIRD FLOOR MAP HERE

[if applicable]

 

FOURTH FLOOR STAFF DIRECTORY

OFFICE PHONE:

HOME PHONE:

1.____________________ ____________________ ____________________

2.____________________ ____________________ ____________________

3.____________________ ____________________ ____________________

4.____________________ ____________________ ____________________

5.____________________ ____________________ ____________________

 

FOURTH FLOOR PRIORITIES

Priority 1:

Priority 2:

Priority 3:

 

FOURTH FLOOR MAP HERE

[if applicable]

[etc., etc., for other floors]

—————————————————————————————————————————————

CHAPTER 6

BOMB THREATS

If a suspicious object or package is found, call _______________ immediately.

If an evacuation is necessary, follow the emergency evacuation instructions in Chapter 2, “Disaster Procedures” in the Disaster Plan Workbook.

If a staff member receives a call reporting a bomb threat, he or she should remain calm and WRITE DOWN the answers to the following questions:

  • When will the bomb explode?
  • Where is the bomb?
  • When was it planted?
  • What does the bomb look like?
  • What type of bomb is it?

The staff member receiving the threat should carefully WRITE DOWN the following information:

  • The exact words of the caller.
  • The explicit motive for the threat.
  • The quality of the caller’s voice: does the caller sound young or old, male or female? Does the caller have an accent? Does the caller sound nervous, determined, etc?

While on the phone, the staff member should signal a nearby employee to call _______________ at once.

It is _______________’s duty to notify all other appropriate individuals, including _______________, the Police and/or Fire Departments.

When the appropriate personnel are notified, they will make a decision to evacuate based on the following criteria:

  • The accessibility of the area to intruders.
  • The terminology used in the bomb threat.
  • The time of day.
  • Current events.
  • The logistics of an evacuation.
  • The means by which the threat was communicated: by mail, hand delivery or phone call.
  • The advice of the Police or Fire Department.

VANDALISM

Vandalism includes but is not limited to the following: damaging or defacing the library/archive/museum building, furniture or equipment; damaging or defacing books, such as tearing out pages, tearing out sections of pages, stealing books, writing in books; eating in the building; and smoking in the building, including bathrooms and private study rooms.

To report cases of vandalism, contact _______________.

In the case of serious destruction of library/archive/museum materials or facilities, do not confront the vandal. Call _______________ from the nearest phone. Arrange a meeting place with _______________ in order to direct them to the area.

SHELVING COLLAPSE

Collapse of shelving, or other structural accidents, such as the collapse of a ceiling or a wall, can be the results of explosions, earthquake, flood or natural deterioration.

When structural damage occurs, call _______________, who will assess the structural damage and/or call the Police or Fire Departments if necessary. After inspection, _______________ will determine when it is safe to entre the area. DO NOT ATTEMPT TO ENTER THE AREA UNTIL _______________ HAS INSPECTED IT.

In the event of a major shelving collapse, call _______________ immediately. Do not enter the area until the _______________ has inspected it; some items may still be unstable. If there are any medical emergencies, follow the procedures outlined in Chapter 6 “Medical Emergencies” in the Disaster Plan Workbook.

Before attempting to reshelve the damaged material, call _______________. Staff from _______________ will advise or assist in handling and reshelving damaged material after the shelving is made secure.

RODENT, INSECT AND MOLD INFESTATION

Many species of fungi and insects can damage library/archive/museum materials. Mold will discolor and weaken paper and bindings; insects such as cockroaches and silverfish attack paper, book cloth, starch paste, animal glue and leather bindings for their cellulose content; rodents such as rats and mice will also destroy many types of library/archive/museum material. Although the Library/Archive/Museum is fumigated on a regular basis to control insects and rodents, and the temperature and relative humidity are controlled to discourage mold growth, these problems may still occur.

All cases of rodent, insect and mold infestation in library/archive/museum material should be reported immediately to _______________. The affected material should be isolated as soon as possible from non-affected material using sealable polyethylene “zip-lock” type bags. _______________ and _______________ departments have a supply of these bags in various sizes. Extreme care should be taken in handling this material as it can be harmful to humans as well as library/archive/museum materials.

_______________ will decide if the damage can be handled in the library/archive/museum or if outside help is needed.

Rodent or insect infestations not affecting library/archive/museum material should be reported to _______________.

SUMMONING MEDICAL ASSISTANCE

The decision to notify or render medical services should be made only by authorized personnel.

If someone is injured or sick and in need of emergency help, call _______________. _______________ personnel will then notify _______________ or other emergency services if necessary.

CHAPTER 7

INVENTORY OF SHARED EMERGENCY SUPPLIES

NOTE: These supplies are stored in _______________. Please see below for the list of key locations.

Item Description                        Quantity in Stock

Bleach                                          __________

Brooms                                        __________

Cardboard boxes,

1 or 1.5 cubic feet,

200 test lb., flattened                   __________

Dehumidifier                                __________

Disposable camera                       __________

Extension cords, 12 ft.                 __________

Fans, electric                                __________

First aid kit, 10-15 people            __________

Flashlight with extra batteries       __________

Garbage container, large plastic    __________

Garbage bags                                __________

Markers, permanent                      __________

Micro cassette recorders with

extra tapes and size AA batteries  __________

Mops                                             __________

Newsprint, unprinted                     __________

Note paper                                    __________

Packing tape dispenser, loaded      __________

Packing tape                                  __________

Paper towels, unprinted                 __________

Pens                                              __________

Plastic buckets                               __________

Plastic gloves, disposable vinyl      __________

Plastic sheeting, 4 mil                    __________

Sorbent pads                                 __________

Sponges                                        __________

Wet dry vacuum                             __________

White cotton gloves                       __________

LIST OF LOCATIONS OF KEYS FOR SHARED EMERGENCY SUPPLIES

CONTACT:

OFFICE PHONE:

HOME PHONE:

1.____________________ ____________________ ____________________

2.____________________ ____________________ ____________________

3.____________________ ____________________ ____________________

4.____________________ ____________________ ____________________

5.____________________ ____________________ ____________________

6.____________________ ____________________ ____________________

7.____________________ ____________________ ____________________

8.____________________ ____________________ ____________________

9.____________________ ____________________ ____________________

10.___________________ ____________________ ____________________

SUPPLIER LIST

[This list will need to be complete and also updated regularly]

Blotting paper:

ARCHIVART
7 Caesar Place
Moonachie, NJ 07074
(ph.) 201-804-8986
(fax) 201-935-5964

____________________(name)
____________________(street address)
____________________(city, state, zip code)
____________________(phone)
____________________(fax)

Boxes:

____________________(name)
____________________(street address)
____________________(city, state, zip code)
____________________(phone)
____________________(fax)

____________________(name)
____________________(street address)
____________________(city, state, zip code)
____________________(phone)
____________________(fax)

Camera supplies:

____________________(name)
____________________(street address)
____________________(city, state, zip code)
____________________(phone)
____________________(fax)

____________________(name)
____________________(street address)
____________________(city, state, zip code)
____________________(phone)
____________________(fax)

Cleaning supplies: mops, brooms, etc. – see Hardware Stores

Cold storage facilities:

____________________(name)
____________________(street address)
____________________(city, state, zip code)
____________________(phone)
____________________(fax)

____________________(name)
____________________(street address)
____________________(city, state, zip code)
____________________(phone)
____________________(fax)

Dust masks:

GRAINGER
527 West 34th Street
New York, NY 10001
(ph.) 212-629-5660
(fax) 212-629-5816

UNIVERSITY PRODUCTS, INC.
P.O. Box 101
South Canal Street
Holyoke, MA 01041
(ph.) 1-800-628-1912
(fax) 1-800-532-9281

____________________(name)
____________________(street address)
____________________(city, state, zip code)
____________________(phone)
____________________(fax)

Food – local supermarkets:

____________________(name)
____________________(street address)
____________________(city, state, zip code)
____________________(phone)
____________________(fax)

____________________(name)
____________________(street address)
____________________(city, state, zip code)
____________________(phone)
____________________(fax)

Garbage bags and containers – see Hardware Stores

Garden hoses – see Hardware Stores

Generators:

____________________(name)
____________________(street address)
____________________(city, state, zip code)
____________________(phone)
____________________(fax)

____________________(name)
____________________(street address)
____________________(city, state, zip code)
____________________(phone)
____________________(fax)

Hardware stores:

____________________(name)
____________________(street address)
____________________(city, state, zip code)
____________________(phone)
____________________(fax)

____________________(name)
____________________(street address)
____________________(city, state, zip code)
____________________(phone)
____________________(fax)

Humidity Indicators:

LIGHT IMPRESSIONS
439 Monroe Avenue
 P.O. Box 940
 Rochester, NY 14603-0940
(ph.) 1-800-828-6216
(fax) 1-800-828-5539
 Overnight delivery available

 

UNIVERSITY PRODUCTS, INC.
 P.O. Box 101 
South Canal Street
 Holyoke, MA 01041
(ph.) 1-800-628-1912
(fax) 1-800-532-9281

____________________(name)
____________________(street address)
____________________(city, state, zip code)
____________________(phone)
____________________(fax)

Humidifiers and Dehumidifiers:

* Services
 MUNTER’S MOISTURE CONTROL SERVICES
 85 Fulton Street, Unit 9D
 Boonton, NJ 07005-1912
(ph.) 201-334-7442
(fax) 201-334-7253

CARGOCAIRE MOISTURE CONTROL SERVICES
 79 Monroe Street
 Amesbury, MA 01913-4740
(ph.) 508-388-0600

____________________(name)
____________________(street address)
____________________(city, state, zip code)
____________________(phone)
____________________(fax)

* Rental
____________________(name)
____________________(street address)
____________________(city, state, zip code)
____________________(phone)
____________________(fax)

____________________(name)
____________________(street address)
____________________(city, state, zip code)
____________________(phone)
____________________(fax)

Newsprint (unprinted):

____________________(name)
____________________(street address)
____________________(city, state, zip code)
____________________(phone)
____________________(fax)

____________________(name)
____________________(street address)
____________________(city, state, zip code)
____________________(phone)
____________________(fax)

Pallet racks:

____________________(name)
____________________(street address)
____________________(city, state, zip code)
____________________(phone)
____________________(fax)

____________________(name)
____________________(street address)
____________________(city, state, zip code)
____________________(phone)
____________________(fax)

Paper towels – see Hardware stores

Plastic sheeting – see Hardware stores and Shrink wrap supplies

Plexiglass:

____________________(name)
____________________(street address)
____________________(city, state, zip code)
____________________(phone)
____________________(fax)

____________________(name)
____________________(street address)
____________________(city, state, zip code)
____________________(phone)
____________________(fax)

Rubber gloves – see Hardware stores

Safety Equipment:

GRAINGER
5 27 West 34th Street
 New York, NY 10001
(ph.) 212-629-5660
(fax) 212-629-5816

EASTCO INDUSTRIAL SAFETY CORPORATION
 130 West 10th Street
 Huntington Station, NY
(ph.) 1-800-221-1224

____________________(name)
____________________(street address)
____________________(city, state, zip code)
____________________(phone)
____________________(fax)

Stationery stores:

____________________(name)
____________________(street address)
____________________(city, state, zip code)
____________________(phone)
____________________(fax)

____________________(name)
____________________(street address)
____________________(city, state, zip code)
____________________(phone)
____________________(fax)

Shrink wrap supplies:

* Industrial equipment
 PRODUCTION PACKAGING EQUIPMENT COMPANY, INC. (PPE)
 35 Urban Avenue
 Westbury, NY 11590
(ph.) 718-895-522
(fax) 516-997-6645

____________________(name)
____________________(street address)
____________________(city, state, zip code)
____________________(phone)
____________________(fax)

* Hand-held equipment
 UNIVERSITY PRODUCTS, INC.
 P.O. Box 101
 South Canal Street
 Holyoke, MA 01041
(ph.) 1-800-628-1912
(fax) 1-800-532-9281

____________________(name)
____________________(street address)
____________________(city, state, zip code)
____________________(phone)
____________________(fax)

Trucks, rental:

____________________(name)
____________________(street address)
____________________(city, state, zip code)
____________________(phone)
____________________(fax)

____________________(name)
____________________(street address)
____________________(city, state, zip code)
____________________(phone)
____________________(fax)

Trucks, refrigerated – see Appendix F, “Document Reprocessing Companies”

Vacuums, wet/dry – see Hardware stores

Wax paper – see Newsprint (unprinted)

White cotton gloves:

UNIVERSITY PRODUCTS, INC.
 P.O. Box 101 
South Canal Street
 Holyoke, MA 01041
(ph.) 1-800-628-1912
(fax) 1-800-532-9281

____________________(name)
____________________(street address)
____________________(city, state, zip code)
____________________(phone)
____________________(fax)

APPENDICES

APPENDIX A:
DAMAGE EVALUATION FORM

Use this form as a master; make copies of this form for use. A separate form should be filled out for each floor affected.

This form must be filled out during initial damage assessment by the Disaster Preparedness Committee and _______________. A completed copy of this form must be sent to _______________.

1. Date:

2. Floor/Department:

3. Type of damage (water, fire, etc):

4. Type of material damaged (books, photographs, etc):

5. Extent of damage (how many volumes, reels, linear feet etc):

6. Environmental conditions (dampness, heat, etc):

7. Condition of surrounding area (wet carpets, wet walls, broken files, etc):

8. Form prepared by:____________________

POST DISASTER REPORT FORM

Use this form as a master; make copies of this form for use. A completed copy of this form must be sent to ____________________.

1. Date of disaster:

2. Floor/Department:

3. Type of disaster:

◦                     Water (flood/leak)

◦                     Fire

◦                     Other – please describe:

4. Source of problem:
Water:

◦                     Pipe(s)

◦                     Drain(s)

◦                     Sink/Toilet

◦                     Roof

◦                     Other:

5. Fire:

◦                     Electrical

◦                     Waste paper

◦                     Other:

6. Area(s) affected:

◦                     East

◦                     West

◦                     North

◦                     South

◦                     Range(s) affected:

7. Approximate number of items involved:

8. Types of materials affected and amounts of each:

◦                     Books

◦                     Microforms

◦                     Drawings

◦                     Manuscripts

◦                     Audiovisual

◦                     Software

◦                     Other – please describe:

9. Recovery options used: (List approximate number of items treated by each method below)

◦                     Air Dry/Interleaving

◦                     Freeze

◦                     Replacement

◦                     Rebind

◦                     Withdrawn

◦                     Evidence of mold

◦                     Other- please specify:

  1. Personnel involved:
  2. Notes(use reverse if necessary):

APPENDIX B
Department Heads Listed Alphabetically by Department

An * is placed by the names of staff who live within one-half hour traveling time of the library/archive/museum.

Department       Name                Office Ph.          Home Ph.

_______________ _______________ _______________ _______________

_______________ _______________ _______________ _______________

_______________ _______________ _______________ _______________

_______________ _______________ _______________ _______________

_______________ _______________ _______________ _______________

_______________ _______________ _______________ _______________

_______________ _______________ _______________ _______________

_______________ _______________ _______________ _______________

_______________ _______________ _______________ _______________

_______________ _______________ _______________ _______________

_______________ _______________ _______________ _______________

_______________ _______________ _______________ _______________

_______________ _______________ _______________ _______________

_______________ _______________ _______________ _______________

_______________ _______________ _______________ _______________

Department Heads, Unit Heads and Supervisors Listed Alphabetically

An * is placed by the names of staff who live within one-half hour traveling time of the library/archive/museum.

Department       Name                Office Ph.          Home Ph.

_______________ _______________ _______________ _______________

_______________ _______________ _______________ _______________

_______________ _______________ _______________ _______________

_______________ _______________ _______________ _______________

_______________ _______________ _______________ _______________

_______________ _______________ _______________ _______________

_______________ _______________ _______________ _______________

_______________ _______________ _______________ _______________

_______________ _______________ _______________ _______________

_______________ _______________ _______________ _______________

_______________ _______________ _______________ _______________

_______________ _______________ _______________ _______________

_______________ _______________ _______________ _______________

_______________ _______________ _______________ _______________

_______________ _______________ _______________ _______________

APPENDIX C
VACUUM FREEZE DRYING SERVICES

 

AMERICAN FREEZE-DRY, INC.
 411 White Horse Pike
 Audubon, NJ 08106 
ph: 609-546-0777
, 24 hour service

BLACKMON-MOORING-STEAMATIC CATASTROPHE (BMS-CAT), INC.
 303 Arthur Street
 Fort Worth, TX 76107 
ph: 800-433-2940, 
24 hour hotline

DOCUMENT REPROCESSORS OF NEW YORK 
5611 Water Street 
Middlesex, NY 14507
 ph: 716-554-4500; fax: 716-554-4114
, 24 hour hotline

DOCUMENT REPROCESSORS OF SAN FRANCISCO 
41 Sutter Street, Ste. 1120
 San Francisco, CA 94104
 ph: 800-437-9464; fax: 415-342-4201
, 24 hour hotline

APPENDIX D
PHOTOGRAPH and SOUND CONSERVATION

ORGANIZATIONS

3M
 at 3M Center St. Paul, MN 
ph: 612-733-1110

EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY
 343 State Street
 Rochester, NY
 ph: 800-242-2424
 Advice for Kodak film only

FILM TECHNOLOGY 
6900 Santa Monica Blvd.
 Hollywood, CA 90038 
ph: 213-464-3456 
16mm and 35mm movie film only

IMAGE PERMANENCE INSTITUTE (IPI)
 Frank E. Gannet Memorial Building
 70 Lomb Memorial Drive
 Rochester, NY 14623-5604
 ph: 716-474-5199; fax: 716-475-7230 
Doug Nishimura: dwnpph@ritvax.isc.rit.edu; James Reilly: jmrpph@ritvax.isc.rit.edu

NATIONAL CENTER FOR FILM AND VIDEO PRESERVATION
 2021 N. Western Avenue 
Los Angeles, CA 90027 
ph: 213-856-7637; fax: 213-467-4578

VIDIPAX, INC.
920 Broadway, 16th floor
 New York, NY 10010
 ph: 212-982-5676; fax: 212-982-6091 
Jim Lindner: vidipaxjim@panix.com (videotape conservation)

LOCAL PRIVATE PHOTOGRAPHIC CONSERVATORS

_______________Name
_______________Address
_______________
_______________Telephone
_______________Fax

_______________Name
_______________Address
_______________
_______________Telephone
_______________Fax

LOCAL PRIVATE SOUND CONSERVATORS

_______________Name
_______________Address
_______________
_______________Telephone
_______________Fax

_______________Name
_______________Address
_______________
_______________Telephone
_______________Fax

APPENDIX E
DOCUMENT REPROCESSING SERVICES

BLACKMON-MOORING-STEAMATIC CATASTROPHE (BMS-CAT), INC.
 303 Arthur Street
 Fort Worth, TX 76107 
ph: 800-433-2940
, 24 hour hotline

DOCUMENT REPROCESSORS OF NEW YORK 
5611 Water Street
 Middlesex, NY 14507
 ph: 716-554-4500; fax: 716-554-4114, 
24 hour hotline

DOCUMENT REPROCESSORS OF SAN FRANCISCO
 41 Sutter Street, Ste. 1120
 San Francisco, CA 94104
 ph: 800-437-9464; fax: 415-342-4201
, 24 hour hotline

APPENDIX F
BOOK AND PAPER CONSERVATION

ORGANIZATIONS

AMERICAN INSTITUTE FOR THE CONSERVATION OF HISTORIC AND ARTISTIC WORKS (AIC)
 1400 16th Street, NW, Ste. 340
 Washington, DC 20036
 ph: 202-452-9545; fax: 202-452-932
 vnaic@aol.com

CONSERVATION CENTER FOR ART AND HISTORIC ARTIFACTS (CCAHA) 
264 South 23rd Street
 Philadelphia, PA 19103
 ph: 215-545-0613; fax: 215-735-9313
 ccaha@shrsys.hslc.org

NORTHEAST DOCUMENT CONSERVATION CENTER (NEDCC)
 100 Brickstone Square 
Andover, MA 01810-1428
 ph: 508-470-1010 – 24 hour help line; fax: 508-475-6021 
NEDCC@world.srd.com

SOUTHEASTERN LIBRARY INFORMATION NETWORK, INC. (SOLINET)
 Preservation Program 
400 Colony Square, Plaza Level
 1202 Peachtree Street, NE
 Atlanta, GA 30361-6301
 ph: 800-999-8558; fax:404-892-7879
 SOLINET-email@mail.solinet.net

LOCAL INSTITUTIONS

_______________Name
_______________Address
_______________
_______________Telephone
_______________Fax

_______________Name
_______________Address
_______________
_______________Telephone
_______________Fax

LOCAL PRIVATE BOOK AND PAPER CONSERVATORS

_______________Name
_______________Address
_______________
_______________Telephone
_______________Fax

_______________Name
_______________Address
_______________
_______________Telephone
_______________Fax

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